Flappers between the covers

The first Max Hurlock Roaring 20s Mystery was Death of a Flapper. Well, to be more precise, it was the first chronologically and was supposed to be the first published as well, but the publisher, a small mystery house, encountered some problems that kept delaying the publication date. Meanwhile, another publisher, Glyphworks Publishing, published Death on a Golden Isle, the second book in the series. This wasn’t a tremendous problem, since each book is based on a different real-life crime and stands on its own, but anyone who reads all the books (Bless your hearts!) might notice it.
Death of a Flapper is based on the famous 1929 Wilson-Roberts case in Moorestown, New Jersey, in which a formerly engaged society couple were found shot multiple times in her bedroom with the door locked from the inside. The big question was if the case was a murder/suicide (Which seemed unlikely because of the multiple wounds), or a double murder (Which seemed equally unlikely because of the locked door.)
At the invitation of several gracious people in Moorestown, I visited the scene of the crime and inspected  the bedroom,  and used the information in the book. Death of a Flapper has the basic details, including a seemingly related murder that happened nearby (also in a locked room!). My detective, Max Hurlock from Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay country gets involved in the case via an old Navy buddy and soon runs afoul of the local police, even so far as being arrested for the second murder!
The details of the real-life case are contained in notes at the back of Death of a Flapper. .
Now, here’s the big news…
Between Wednesday, August 20, and Wednesday, August 27, the Kindle version of Death of a Flapper, normally $2.99, will be available at a special promotional price of only 99 cents. Here is the link. And for more information about Death of a Flapper, including a link to the book trailer, go here.

flapperfront

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